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All in all, a great guide for any woman who thinks 50 and up might be a little too much.

In a way, reading The Middle Pause is like turning your change into a living novella. Hot Flushes Cold Science: A History of the Modern Menopause by Louise Foxcroft is a well-researched, informative read about the setting, history and reality of menopause.

Hot Flushes, Cold Science: A History of the Modern Menopause by Louise Foxcroft ~ things mean a lot

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Home Page About Dr. Christiane Northrup Dr. By the end of the book, the message is pretty much the same, except that the author has bunged in a lot more evidence.

Hot Flushes Cold Science - A History of the Modern Menopause Paperback

On the up side - these conclu By the end of the intro and chapter one I get that the author is trying to say two things: menopause is not so bad and here is the evidence and menopause does not cause all kinds of nastiness loss of bone density, vaginal dryness, madness, hot flushes, libido fluctuations, depression etc. On the up side - these conclusions are good and life confirming and, as such, they should be a basic part of everyone's education - male, female or any combination thereof. On the down side - there is waaay too much supporting evidence to wade through to get to this simple conclusion.

By evidence, I mean that the author seems to have read many, many books about attitudes to menopause over the last 2 or 3 thousand years and she has picked out the parts that support her argument. And that is my main problem - she has cherry picked. She quotes a lot of stuff that supports her thesis, but very little that opposes it. And while her material is I assume directly quoted from her literature, it seems to be only one side of a story menopausal women have had a rough deal from the 'establishment'. I accept that if someone wants to grind an axe, they will pick out the tools that facilitate that exercise.

But, for me, I would love to see a deeper dive into this matter, one that looks at all sides of the story, one that takes in the triumphs of human spirit and literature, not just one that affirms the baser side of humanity's nature. So, the overall message for me except the book is not for me - there is only one chapter about menopause in men is: "don't worry about it so much - be free to coincide with yourself.

If anyone were to ask me now about menopause, my reply to them would be brighter and lighter than it would have been before reading this tome. Yay for tomes! A well considered and well put together book on how women's bodies have been viewed over the ages. The view that women's bodies do not appear to match up to men's has resulted in a "diseased" view of the normal changes in the bodies of women.

Louise Foxcroft explores the importance of recognising that many of the so called symptoms of menopause may either be due to the natural ageing process or are a social construction, primarily propagated by men. Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews.

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Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Aug 22, Robert Day rated it liked it Shelves: knowledge.

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By the end of the intro and chapter one I get that the author is trying to say two things: menopause is not so bad and here is the evidence and menopause does not cause all kinds of nastiness loss of bone density, vaginal dryness, madness, hot flushes, libido fluctuations, depression etc. By the end of the book, the message is pretty much the same, except that the author has bunged in a lot more evidence.

On the up side - these conclu By the end of the intro and chapter one I get that the author is trying to say two things: menopause is not so bad and here is the evidence and menopause does not cause all kinds of nastiness loss of bone density, vaginal dryness, madness, hot flushes, libido fluctuations, depression etc. On the up side - these conclusions are good and life confirming and, as such, they should be a basic part of everyone's education - male, female or any combination thereof. On the down side - there is waaay too much supporting evidence to wade through to get to this simple conclusion.

By evidence, I mean that the author seems to have read many, many books about attitudes to menopause over the last 2 or 3 thousand years and she has picked out the parts that support her argument. And that is my main problem - she has cherry picked. She quotes a lot of stuff that supports her thesis, but very little that opposes it. And while her material is I assume directly quoted from her literature, it seems to be only one side of a story menopausal women have had a rough deal from the 'establishment'.

I accept that if someone wants to grind an axe, they will pick out the tools that facilitate that exercise. But, for me, I would love to see a deeper dive into this matter, one that looks at all sides of the story, one that takes in the triumphs of human spirit and literature, not just one that affirms the baser side of humanity's nature. So, the overall message for me except the book is not for me - there is only one chapter about menopause in men is: "don't worry about it so much - be free to coincide with yourself.

If anyone were to ask me now about menopause, my reply to them would be brighter and lighter than it would have been before reading this tome. Yay for tomes! A well considered and well put together book on how women's bodies have been viewed over the ages. The view that women's bodies do not appear to match up to men's has resulted in a "diseased" view of the normal changes in the bodies of women.

Louise Foxcroft explores the importance of recognising that many of the so called symptoms of menopause may either be due to the natural ageing process or are a social construction, primarily propagated by men. The hot flushes are indeed a symptom of menopa A well considered and well put together book on how women's bodies have been viewed over the ages.

The hot flushes are indeed a symptom of menopause and I for one am grateful to be alive today and not at a time when I could have been bled, institutionalised or had my reproductive organs removed. A must read for women of all ages Mar 17, Charlie rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction.

Can hot flushes cause nausea? - Hot Flush Month

This is a medical and social history encapsulating the rise of the scientific medical profession in the West whose practitioners were almost exclusively male and its interaction with a very taboo ridden society, to create a medicalisation of a natural part of female ageing, the menopause. When a society believes that older women are partially dead because they are no longer fertile they are useless and pointless and purposeless , then the rise of a science that thinks itself able to cure anyt This is a medical and social history encapsulating the rise of the scientific medical profession in the West whose practitioners were almost exclusively male and its interaction with a very taboo ridden society, to create a medicalisation of a natural part of female ageing, the menopause.

When a society believes that older women are partially dead because they are no longer fertile they are useless and pointless and purposeless , then the rise of a science that thinks itself able to cure anything sounds like it would be a boon.